Home > Articles posted by admin

Author Archive

5 Common Errors Made in Mindfulness

Posted on: July 29th, 2014 by admin No Comments

In the course of my teaching Mindfulness over the last ten years, I have found a number of common errors when establishing errors mindfulnessmindfulness in our daily lives. The following describes the errors and how to correct them.

Error 1. Not Understanding the Necessity of Repetition 

Mastery of any skill requires repetition. If you are wanting to learn to live mindfully, you must first commit yourself to practicing mindfulness daily. Mindfulness is something you practice until it’s something you are. There are no short-cuts or quick fixes. It’s more than an intellectual understanding it’s experiential. The saying goes, “The practice is the teacher.”

In the same way you would master a physical skill, such as riding a bike or playing an instrument, you wouldn’t expect to become proficient in the skill by attending a seminar or reading a book about it. In fact, it has been said that the magic number for mastery of a new skill is set at 10,000 hours.

Consider this: How many hours have you spent in your lifetime repeating detrimental and irrational thoughts about yourself? This has been practiced by repetition to the point you probably believe those thoughts at an emotional level where belief turns into a knowing. Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy teaches you to step back from patterns of thought so you can look AT them from a point of non-identification rather than FROM them in a fused way.

Breaking old habits or patterns of thought will take you committing yourself to the practice both formally through meditation practice where you learn to watch your thinking and use the breath and the body as an anchor and in more informal settings when the mind is apt to wander such as brushing your teeth, taking a shower or whenever we find ourself in situations or circumstances where we are tempted to react based on habit or compulsion.

The more you practice and commit yourself to learning the skills by reading books, watching videos and dedicating yourself to mindfulness, all the better to master this practice and let it teach you to live in the present moment with the empowerment of choice.

Error 2. Expecting to Fix Yourself

Participants come to the course looking to “fix” something about themselves. Perhaps they have suffered from anxiety, depression or feel the strain of stress in their lives. They see themselves as a problem to solve and mindfulness becomes the antidote to cure their problem.

In mindfulness we learn that the present moment is the only moment that is real and  when you really begin to experience this truth you recognize that all the stories you’ve told yourself and the concept of who you think you are stems from having your mind in the former present moments of your personal history. This doesn’t mean that what happened to you is trivial or unimportant or that you are ‘nothing’ and that your concerns are not real. What it does mean is that you learn to see the concept of yourself as just that; an accumulation of experiences to which you have applied meaning, implication and consequence. You are the author and editor of your life. This takes skill and deep understanding that thoughts are not facts, just your verbal relationship with reality.

Consider this: By considering yourself a problem that needs to be fixed, you create a pattern of thought that keeps the problem in place. It’s the thoughts themselves that are the source of your concern, so by learning to change your relationship to your thinking – the concept of yourself changes. You recognize that you are not a problem to solve and there is nothing to fix. You can just BE who you are really which has little to do with your verbal relationship with the external world.

I recognize that this may cause you some confusion – let it be okay that it does. Whenever we challenge old, limiting patterns of thought, a feeling of confusion may happen – this is a good thing! This means that the old patterns can fall away and what comes forth is a clearer understanding of what it means to be who you really are.

Error 3: Overthinking 

I have worked with clients who are very insightful about their concern, but still cannot seemingly learn to defuse from patterns of thought, problem solve everything and analyze every feeling they have. Thinking is the cornerstone to how we relate to life, however, relying too much on our thinking actually becomes part of why we feel stuck. Our thoughts are compelling and they help us to make sense of things and through your mindfulness practice, you learn to change your relationship to thinking and let go of the need to make sense of everything and analyze it.

I often say to clients that, “Some things are not meant to be understood, they are just meant to be felt.” This may seem easy to understand but by the very need to understand it we begin to trap ourselves into the mental gymnastics of making sense of everything, especially our feelings.

Consider this: Thoughts are thoughts. They are images, pictures, dialogue all woven together that tells you a story of what happened to you before now, what is happening now and what may happen in the future. Our minds think thoughts, that’s it’s job and it does it very well, but it largely happens automatically without inquiry as to whether these thoughts are true or false, real or imagined… and the need to make sense of everything becomes necessity and contaminates your present moment awareness to the point you are living in your thoughts instead of the realness of the moment.

Through practice you create a different relationship to your thoughts and the need to think your way out of everything is diminished and replaced with the contentment which comes from getting out of your head and into the present moment with mindfulness.

Error 4: Lacking Self Compassion

We are hard on ourselves. We’ve learned to strive for certain ideal of who we want to be and we compare this to the who we were before in the past and the who we are now and the who we want to be in the future and this form of striving means we always make the present moment not good enough. By cultivating mindfulness and self awareness we can open ourselves up to a more gentle, kind and compassionate way of being – letting go of comparison, striving mentality.

Consider this: Compassion is the clear seeing of suffering and meeting the suffering with kindness. Instead of ruminating, intellectualizing, striving or rejecting the present moment as not being up to par, we embrace it, even if it’s hard and we learn to open ourselves to be gentle. Suffering is an indication that more kindness is needed instead of layering the problem, avoiding or distracting ourselves, we turn towards and acknowledge it fully with kindness towards ourselves and others. Science is learning how compassion is good for us. This is the a new pathway to our ever evolving minds.

Error 5: Withholding Acceptance

Acceptance in a foundational attitude in mindfulness and it underpins everything mindfulness is. Acceptance is in essences the non-judgemental part of the definition of mindfulness (mindfulness is non-judgemental present moment awareness). In order to be non-judgemental we cultivate the attitude of acceptance. It’s simple really, but not easy. Acceptance is less an intellectual understanding and more an heart education – it’s a feeling more than a thought. I always teach that mindfulness is about uniting the mind and the heart – our intellectual and emotional states of being into balance. When we do so we are able to bring acceptance to things which we want to change.

In actuality, nothing can change until it is accepted. This is because it cannot truly be seen as it is without it. We must be clear in what how things affect us in order to be fully present with it. This takes a radical honesty that acceptance bring us. Clients / participants do not fully understand acceptance and believe it means you resign or submit to tolerate things you don’t like. This is not true. If there was something you didn’t like, you’d acknowledge it fully – you’d see it for what it is, how it is, right now and accept the impact it has on you, even if it’s uncomfortable. The key is to do so, without using acceptance as a way to change it. Acceptance is non-conditional and means you fully accept it, even if it’s uncomfortable, painful and you acknowledge  that. This is not approval, it’s not say you are enjoying the painful experience, it means you accept the truth of it and see / feel it clearly.

Consider this: Acceptance is practiced and cultivated. It’s an education and unification of the emotional and intellectual. Acceptance is transformative because it’s about letting go of the struggle you are having with things. When you do so, you release  the energy that was captured by holding on to the struggle which frees it up to be used for creative and meaningful changes.

 

Autumn 2014: 8-Week MBCT Course – Birmingham

Posted on: July 2nd, 2014 by admin 2 Comments

8-Week Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT)

September 2014:

Harborne, Birmingham, West Midlands

Harborne Complementary Health Clinic
321 Harborne Lane
Harborne, West Midlands
B17 0NT

Start: 10/09/2014 19:30 PM
End : 29/10/2014 21:30 PM

Solihull, West Midlands

Women’s Institute
745 Warwick Road
Solihull, West Midlands, B91 3DG

Start: 09/09/2014 19:30 PM
End : 28/10/2014 21:30 PM

October 2014:

Royal Leamington Spa, Warwickshire

The Sydni Centre
Cottage Square, Sydenham,
Royal Leamington Spa, Warwickshire
CV31 1PT

Start: 27/10/2014 18:30 PM
End : 15/12/2014 20:30 PM

This is a structured group program that teaches you the principles of mindfulness and provides practical and theoretical, secular learning experience for personal development.

Space is strictly limited and advance booking is required. Each class is two hours and includes all materials including handbook and guided meditation audio mp3s for home practice.

Cost: Early bird £200.00 (ends 31/07/2014) Full price £250.00 – some concessionary places available for those on low income and benefits (contact to discuss).

Booking:
http://mymindfulnesspractice.com/book-mindfulness-course/

About the MBCT course:

Objective is to teach mindfulness based principles and to help participants develop their practice and a different way of relating to sensations, thoughts, feelings specifically, mindful acceptance and acknowledgement of unwanted feelings and thoughts rather thank habitual, automatic, pre-programmed routines that tend to perpetuate difficulties. This will help participants to choose the most skillful response to any unpleasant thoughts, feelings or situation that they meet.

Each week has a theme based on the MBCT curriculum content, including: What is autopilot and how to switch to being mode, dealing with barriers, the problem with problem solving, staying present, allowing / letting be, thoughts are not facts, how to best take care of yourself and using what has been learned to deal with future moods.

About the teacher:

Brenda Bentley is a certified to teach Mindfulness Based courses and is a therapist in private practice specializing in overcoming anxiety disorders. She has been practicing mindfulness for over seven years both personally and in one to one treatment with clients.Our courses meet the requirements by the Good Practice Guidance for Teaching Mindfulness-Based Courses published by the UK Network of Mindfulness-Based Teacher Trainers.

Free Introduction to Mindfulness Orlando 2015

Posted on: May 14th, 2014 by admin 1 Comment

Free Introduction to Mindfulness:

7pm to 9pm

Tuesday, 6th January 2015

Venue:

The Center
946 N Mills Avenue
Orlando, FL 32803

Free introductory to the proceeding 6-week course beginning which begins on 14th January 2015.

Workshop content:

- What is mindfulness?

- What is MBCT?

- What are the aims?

- Learn about the course content

- Learn about foundational mediations

- Learn about attitudinal foundations

- Group exercises & practice

- Q & A

This is a FREE introductory course for up to 60 people. Advanced booking is required as space is limited. There is no obligation and there we be no sales pitch! The purpose of the course is to bring secular Mindfulness-Based Interventions & Approaches to Central Florida. The full course is a foundational course pre-requisite  that precedes an accredited teacher training course which will is scheduled to be delivered in 2016. The course is open to everyone and is non-religious in content.

To read about the course, visit here.

To book your place on the free introduction please provide your details (REQUIRED):





Please enter your details and questions below:

Your Name (required)

Email (required)

Telephone (required)

If you’d like to leave a message or have other names of guests attending with you, enter here:

Choosing a Mindfulness Teacher

Posted on: May 9th, 2014 by admin 1 Comment

With Mindfulness entering mainstream popularity, it’s almost everyday you hear about in the news or see it in a story. Courses and training schools seem to be popping up everyday and I can foresee a surge in people jumping on the mindfulness bandwagon and profiteering from the demand.

There’s a lot of different types of mindfulness teachers out there, from different backgrounds and some even use the words “accreditation” or “licensed”  in promotion of their courses. In fact, it seems you can learn to be a mindfulness teacher in less than seven days, with no prerequisite or background in counselling or mental health for very little monetary investment, and without actually working with one client during your training and graduate with a “accredited” or “licensed” qualification based on displaying some knowledge of the subject matter. These fledgling graduates are let out into the world after a few days learning who will be providing “therapeutic” services to the public for depression, anxiety and trauma – which frankly, is alarming.

So how can you ensure you are learning from a teacher who has the experience, qualifications and necessary training or pick a mindfulness school? Here’s some advice:

ACCREDITATION

There is no governing body in the field of mindfulness. Some people start teaching mindfulness after reading a book, whilst others spend up to 5 years of training before teaching mindfulness. When choosing a teacher or course provider, check they have undertaken a teaching certification that meets the requirements of the Good Practice Guidance for Teaching Mindfulness-Based Courses published by the UK Network of Mindfulness-Based Teacher Trainers. 

You may also be interested in becoming a Mindfulness Teacher – so what does “accredited” really mean? Truth is anyone can set up a training school and accredit their own courses – through themselves – with no external verifying professional body. When considering choosing a teacher training school, you will need to also check that the course meets the following Good Practice Guidelines for Trainers of Mindfulness-Based Teachers which states that a minimum standard for teacher training is to check that teacher trainer has had full teaching responsibility for at least nine mindfulness-based courses over a minimum of three years and the training pathway offered is a minimum of 12 months in duration.

Check your training school is on this list before applying.

UK Network of Mindfulness Based Teacher Trainers

You may also check that they are have association to a profession body, undertake supervision from a mindfulness teacher that does meet the requirements as stated above and are fully insured.

 

This is Your Brain on Mindfulness Meditation

Posted on: April 17th, 2014 by admin 2 Comments

Participating in an 8-week mindfulness meditation program appears to make measurable changes in brain regions associated with memory, sense of self, empathy and stress according to Sara Lazar, Ph.D., the study’s senior author in a press release.

A group of Harvard neuroscientists interested in mindfulness meditation have reported that brain structures change after only eight weeks of meditation practice.

“Although the practice of meditation is associated with a sense of peacefulness and physical relaxation,  practitioners have long claimed that meditation also provides cognitive and psychological benefits that persist throughout the day.”

For the study, neuroscientists enrolled 16 people in an eight-week mindfulness-based stress reduction course. The participants received audio recordings containing 45-minute guided mindfulness meditations  including the body scan, yoga, and sitting meditation and were instructed to practice daily at home. They were also taught to practice mindfulness informally by bringing their awareness, mindfully to routine activities that are mostly done mindlessly or automatically such as eating, walking, washing the dishes, taking a shower, and so on. On average, the meditation group participants spent an average of 27 minutes a day practicing some form of mindfulness.

Magnetic resonance images (MRI scans) of everyone’s brains were taken before and after they completed the meditation training, and a control group of people who didn’t do any mindfulness training also had their brains scanned. After completing the mindfulness course, all participants reported significant improvement in measures of mindfulness, such as “acting with awareness” and “non-judging.”

mindfulness meditation brain function

The MRI scans show startling evidence that mindfulness participants brains were affected with increased gray matter concentration within the left hippocampus, the posterior cingulate cortex, the temporo-parietal junction and the cerebellum these brain regions involved in learning and memory, emotion regulation, sense of self and perspective taking.

 

Britta Hölzel, the lead author on the paper says,

“It is fascinating to see the brain’s plasticity and that, by practicing meditation, we can play an active role in changing the brain and can increase our well-being and quality of life.”

Sarah Lazar also noted,

“This study demonstrates that changes in brain structure may underlie some of these reported improvements and that people are not just feeling better because they are spending time relaxing.”

Here’s Sarah Lazar TEDx talk discussing the findings in this video:

Mindfulness Courses in Orlando

Posted on: April 10th, 2014 by admin 5 Comments

mindfulness orlando

6-Week MBCT Experiential

Brenda Bentley, certified mindfulness teacher and therapist will be delivering the Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) in a 6-week experiential structured format in Orlando, Florida beginning in January 2015.

About the course:

This course offers participants an opportunity to explore the 8-week Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy programme in a 6-week format.

Please note that this course does not equip participants to teach the MBCT programme, but will help to establish or deepen a personal meditation practice, which forms a necessary foundation for training to become an instructor (UK Network for Mindfulness-Based Teacher Trainers, Good Practice Guidelines).

The course follows the standard MBCT curriculum with added insights and exercises borrowed from Acceptance & Commitment Therapy (ACT). MBCT was developed for depression out of Oxford University but this course has been modified for a general audience who would like to learn how to change their relationship to their thoughts and learn to manage their emotions in a mindful way. The teachings are secular and anyone from any belief or faith can benefit from learning the principles and how to integrate mindfulness into their lives.

The course is delivered in a engaging format which includes theoretical  presentation and foundational guided meditations. Although Mindfulness has a rich history in Buddhism, this course of MBCT is secular and is suitable for everyone. The course includes all materials including 50+ page handbook, guided meditation MP3s, presentation notes and other resources.

Who is this course for?

The course is open to anyone who is interested in learning MBCT for personal development or those with some familiarity with cognitive therapy for depression who would like to explore the possibility of integrating this approach in their practice.

The core aspect of the course is to teach people to principles of mindfulness and how they can integrate both a formal and informal practices into their daily lives. To learn more about the curriculum click here. To learn more about the aims click here. Read what other participants have said about their experience click here.

About the teacher:

Brenda is a qualified Mindfulness Teacher and accredited therapist in private practice with a particular interest in working with people suffering from anxiety related concerns. Brenda benefits from years of experience in delivering the content to groups and has a engaging and friendly manner. Having managed her own anxiety disorder with mindfulness, she has a unique position within her understanding of these concerns. Read more about Brenda Bentley.

Free Introduction to Mindfulness:

January 6th – 2015
7:00pm to 9:00pm

More details and RSVP here.

Dates for the weekly course:

Each Tuesday 6:00pm to 9:00pm (excluding January 6th Introduction which is 7:00pm to 9:00pm)
January 6, 13, 20, 27; February 3, 10 – 2015

Structure:

January 6th – Introduction

January 13th - Weeks 1 & 2

January 20th – Weeks 3 & 4

January 27th – Weeks 5 & 6

February 3rd – Week 7 & 8

February 10th – Conclusion

The course will be run in the evening from 6:00pm to 9:00pm and includes comfort breaks &  light refreshments.

Venue:

The Center
946 N Mills Avenue
Orlando, FL 32803

Cost per delegate:

Early bird ticket until 10/31/2014 – $350

Full price ticket – $450

Fees may be covered by your Employee Assistance Program and a letter of confirmation of your booking for your employer can be provided on request.

Due to the demand for this type of course, it is expected that capacity will be met. This is the only time in 2015 that this course will be available and early booking is recommended to avoid disappointment.

The purpose of the course is to bring secular Mindfulness-Based Interventions & Approaches to Central Florida. The full course is a foundational course pre-requisite  that precedes an accredited teacher training course which will is scheduled to be delivered in 2016. The course is open to everyone and is non-religious in content.


Items in Your Cart

Your cart is empty

To register interest or for more information contact below:





Please enter your details and questions below:

Your Name (required)

Email (required)

 

 

Mini-Mindfulness for the Busy

Posted on: April 2nd, 2014 by admin 1 Comment

mindfulness practiceWhat does it mean to be mindful? Is it about meditating for countless hours in a special posture, on a deserted beach at sunset as a feeling of Zen washes through you as you bask in your enlightenment?

Whatever you think of when you think of being mindful may be tied up in the traditional idea of meditation and some of the benefits that it can bring. It’s worth noting that mindfulness is a personal practice and can be whatever you need it to be and can fit in with your life by adapting and integrating it to suit you.

Being mindful has its benefits, such has improved brain function, concentration, creativity and emotional balance. Mindfulness is, quite simply, the skill of being present and aware of the present moment with a certain attitude such as acceptance, compassion or curiosity which is as non-judgmental as best we can. In order to reap the benefits, mindfulness must be cultivated by practice. They say, “the practice is the teacher,” and this is because it is simple to understand but not as easy in its application.

By our very nature we are predisposed to feeling aversion to things that make us feel uncomfortable. When we feel uneasy or stressed we react to it by avoiding, distracting of trying to change it, but with mindfulness we can learn to approach difficulty in a mindful way that gives us peace of mind and emotional stability. A mindful approach is a considered, skillful response to difficulty that is independent of past conditioning and behavioral predispositions. Our energy that was once tied up in judgement and blame can be re-established to seeing a solution you would have overlooked before.

Sounds great, but the notion of meditating for hours each day to cultivate this awareness seem daunting and off-putting to you? Meditation is the best tool for the job, but this can be practiced to fit your needs. As a mindfulness teacher, I believe in having a personal mindfulness practice, in essence, weaving mindfulness into your life in a way that works for you. Even if mindfulness is about structured practice, there is room for you to integrate this based on your personal preferences. Learning to trust yourself and meet your needs is what mindfulness is all about!

Here are some techniques you can use:

Mini-meditations – here are instructions for taking an intentional mindful pause, several times throughout the day for 1 to 3 minutes each time.

  1. Pause
  2. Notice what you notice with all your senses
  3. Notice your breath and breathing
  4. Notice what thoughts are here
  5. Notice what sensations are here
  6. Notice what sounds are here
  7. Invite in a quality of non-judgement, acceptance or opening to this moment just as it is
  8. Breath in and out of this awareness
  9. Proceed

As you practice mini-meditations throughout your day you’ll begin to notice how less reactive you are to life which could bring a sense of balance or calm. You can create reminders for yourself by setting alarms or using an free app like the mindfulness bell. You could also use the natural pauses throughout the day such as moving from here to there, going to the restroom, washing your hands, making tea or coffee or just as you go from task to task.

Try “Acting Mindful” - as a way to bring intentionally mindful action throughout your day.

  1. When listening to someone speak, listen moments at time, actively listening and when you notice an urge to reply, judgement, evaluation, interpretation, thoughts or you just wandered to “somewhere else” bring your awareness gently back to listening.
  2. When doing an activity that would have been doing mindlessly, actively and intentionally train your awareness to be present during each moment engaging all your senses such as with driving a car, washing your hands, brushing your teeth or eating a meal. You’ll be surprised how much you “zone-out” of awareness and get more out of each moment when you do.
  3. Whenever you find yourself getting “set off” or triggered and are having an emotional reaction, you know you can practice mindfulness. To practice stepping back in this way by just observing yourself without judgement as if watching an actor in a play go through the motions as if scripted to learn about the character’s motivations. It’s a form of de-centering that is unlike analyzing and more like inquiry and curiosity.

Practicing mindfulness whether in a formal or informal way doesn’t need to be about sitting in a posture for long periods of time. Learning mindfulness is about the practice of it and  you can start right now in this moment (beach, sunset and enlightenment optional).

To learn more about how to integrate mindfulness into your life, contact us:





Request either a telephone call or request more information:

Call Me Request Information by Email 

Your Name (required)

Email (required)

Telephone (required)

Select:

Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy Course (MBCT) – Orlando, Florida

Posted on: March 30th, 2014 by admin 2 Comments

Central Florida Mindfulness
Orlando, Lake Mary, Altamonte Springs, Maitland, Winter Park

Brenda Bentley is travelling to Orlando, Florida in January 2015 and will be offering the 6-Week Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) to local participants. Dates to be confirmed. This is the first time that this course will be offered in this way in the Orlando area and spaces are strictly limited. For more information and booking please visit:

Mindfulness is an innate capacity of the mind to be aware of the present moment in a non-judgmental way. It promotes a way of being that helps us to take better care of ourselves and lead healthier lives. It enables us to access inner resources for coping effectively with stress, difficulty and illness.

Through being mindful, you discover how to live in the present moment in an enjoyable way rather than worrying about the past or being concerned about the future.

Mindfulness is a particular type of meditation that’s been well-researched and tested in clinical settings. It has been proven to help manage stress, anxiety, anger, fatigue, fear, pain, depression and assist in healing. Mindfulness is not focused on ‘fixing’ problems, it emphasizes acceptance first. Mindfulness is a secular tool used for personal development. It is more than meditation, it is a way of life. People practice being mindful, develop awareness of their thoughts, feelings and behaviors which empowers them with choice. It’s like getting off of autopilot and getting into the driver seat of your life.

Classes are led by an established teacher who is certified to deliver Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) as developed for depression at Oxford University in the UK but has been modified for a general audience and taught in a friendly group setting. Read more about the structure of the course and it’s aims. Read testimonials from past participants.

If you are interested in joining the mailing list to receive dates when they are announced and to receive promotional pricing, please complete the contact form. Places are strictly limited and available on a first-come-first-served basis.

Booking for the course is now open. Book here.





Please enter your details and questions below:

Your Name (required)

Email (required)

 

Praise for a Mindful Revolution

Posted on: February 4th, 2014 by admin No Comments

time mindfulnessMindfulness made the cover of Time Magazine this week in an article entitled: The Mindful Revolution: The science of finding focus in a stressed-out, multitasking culture.

There was also a critique written by Joanna Piacenza on Huffington Post that highlighted some of the more superficial aspects and gender politics of the cover image of a pretty blondes in a sitting meditation. The article also unfortunately seamlessly weaves mindfulness in with religious teaching of Buddhism when it is not exclusively connected. The focus on the aesthetics of a story rather than the content seems superficial to me but gender based politics is a hot topic so whatever you need to get people to read your article I guess!

America is the most highly medicated populations in the world with antidepressants being the 3rd most common prescription drug administered. According to statistics (2011) one in 10 Americans now takes an antidepressant medication and  the rate of antidepressant use in this country among people ages 12 and older increased by almost 400% between 1988–1994 and 2005–2008.

Shocking?! Not if you are American. It’s just accepted as normal. I am American expatriate and this has provided me with some insight in the the peculiarities of this by contrast and comparison to the UK where I currently reside. Mostly this has been done through my family relations and friendships; the majority of them have been prescribed antidepressants of some kind.

When I am visiting back home in the states, I am always horrified by the amount of commercials there are advertising prescription drugs and urging the viewer to “ask their doctor about so and so.” My mouth gapes open each time they race through the list of side effects such as, “internal bleeding, blindness and death.” WTF. Don’t get me going on how antidepressants don’t even work for the majority and are really no better than placebo according to research, but if you want to go there read this.

A mindful revolution may be just what is needed to bring people back from mindless medicating. Let the mindfulness bells chime for the masses so America (and the world) WAKES UP and breaks out of the reliance of psychoactive drugs to replace it with a more empowering and sustainable way to change their relationship with their stress, depression, anxiety, et al. I think it is good coverage to bring mindfulness out of the shadows and clarify it’s practice and purpose.

One interesting insight I discovered in the article is how in Silicon Valley, it is trendy to practice mindfulness. I hope this trend continues and expands.

Source:

1. Wehrwein, P. (2011) Harvard Health Blog; http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/astounding-increase-in-antidepressant-use-by-americans-201110203624

2. I. Kirsch, “Antidepressants: The Emperor’s New Drugs?” The Huffington Post; (2010), http://www.huffingtonpost.com/irving-kirsch-phd/antidepressants-the-emper_b_442205.html.

 

 

Mindfulness Exercise: Silent Walking

Posted on: January 31st, 2014 by admin No Comments

mindfulness birminghamHere’s a simple informal practice of mindfulness you can incorporate into your daily life. The aim is to engage awareness of everything the senses can take in from moment to moment. The purpose is to cultivate present moment awareness in a non-judgmental way. The labeling and word repetition is to support the process of de-centering or defusing from the content that our mind gives us. You become the observer of experience and look AT your thoughts instead of FROM your thoughts.

  1. Take ten minutes or longer and walk silently. You can do this indoors or outdoors.
  2. Remain silent throughout the entire walk so you can “listen” to the content of your mind is producing.
  3. As your attention is drawn to particular things you become aware of objects in your environment or thoughts, inner dialogue, feelings, sounds,  sensations in your body, call them out by saying them three times. For example, when a car passes by, say to yourself, “car, car, car.” If you start to feel stress in your body you say “stress” three times. Notice what happens when you do this.
  4. Continue to label and repeat as you notice.